Reviews

All reviews published in the Guernsey Evening Press:  

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Review of May 2011 concert: Haydn's Creation - by Ed Jewell 

Review of May 2014 concert: A Night at the Opera - by Bridget McRae

 

Review of Christmas Concert 2014: Haydn's Wind Band Mass:by Michael Sproule

Picture a hamper of Christmas delights and there it is, adorned with ribbons of love and affection, presented by the Guernsey Choral & Orchestral Society and Children's Choir at St James on the Friday and Saturday before Christmas.

Santa drops in of course with a merry quip and a yo ho ho. Not before the Choir and Orchestra have romped their way through a crisp and even account of Haydn's Wind Band Mass led by soloists, Deborah Bideau (soprano), Olivia Warburton (mezzo), Richard Dowling (tenor) and Malachy Frame (baritone).

Particularly enjoyable were the 'duet' for mezzo and flute (Charlie Cottam) in the 'Gratias agimus', the sprightly 'Benedictus' for the chorus, and the 'Agnus Dei' quartet with its gorgeous 'Mozartian' bassoon part (Jean Owen).

Later, bursting with excitement and festive energy, the assembled company break into those classic carols which, if Desert Island Discs only allowed Christmas music, would be on the one surviving disc when the others were jettisoned.

Short of Bing's White Christmas, this really had the lot - a jaunty sleigh ride and seasonal Tchaikovsky from the orchestra directed by Michael Sullivan, angelic children's voices in 'Walking in the Air' and the Rocking Carol, and Vaughan Williams's tender Fantasia on Christmas Carols in which Mr Malachy returned to the platform to solo with the choir.

Marvellously well done and a Happy New Year to one and all!

This poor man now has to venture forth to forage for the odd scrap of winter fuel but perhaps a good king will turn up and lighten the load ..."
 

 

Review of May 2015 Concert by Micheal Sproule 

Three universal themes were explored by the Guernsey Choral & Orchestral Society under Alan Gough's sure direction at St James last Saturday - that the price of a nation's liberty is defiance of tyranny; that the cost of war in defence of that liberty is the pity and folly of human waste; and that the salvation of humanity rests with the virtue and heroism of ordinary people, willing to pay that cost in the name of faith, hope and love.

How fitting to do so at the time of the bicentenary of the Battle of Waterloo, the centenary of the darkest days of the Great War and the 70th anniversary of our liberation!

The first theme was expressed in Sibelius's great anthem 'Finlandia', exuberantly performed by the whole ensemble, and in 'Nimrod' from Elgar's Enigma Variations.

The second theme was performed very movingly by soloists, Amy Bottriell-Nye and Malachy Frame, choir and orchestra in Durufle's 'Requiem', which in this large scale version at times calls to mind the musical language of Britten's War Requiem. Mr Gough's control and mastery of his forces in this technically demanding piece was exemplary.

The final theme was celebrated by Stanford's grand Te Deum in B flat and in Vaughan Williams's sublime 'Five Mystical Songs', one of the highpoints of which was the beautifully heartfelt rendering by Mr Frame and choir of 'Love Bade Me Welcome'.

The choir excelled in the uplifting 'Christe Eleisons' of the Duruflé and the "Let All The Worlds" of the Vaughan Williams.

As for the orchestra, special praise for the strings in the Vaughan Williams, the Wind section in the Durufle, the brass in the Sibelius, and everyone in the radiant Elgar."

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 Review of Christmas 2015 Concert by Micheal Sproule

 

A PERFECT PRELUDE TO THE FESTIVITIES

What a hamper of Christmas goodies was served up by GCOS and Children's Choir at St James under the fine direction of Alan Gough on the Friday and Saturday before Christmas!

(On Saturday we missed Michael Sullivan's conducting contribution, thanks to changed travel arrangments - more of which from Santa later.)

First up was the Mass in B flat by Johann Hummel.

For all his sterling work as top pianist of his day, with Schumann and Liszt queuing up for lessons, poor Hummel will stand for all eternity in the shadows of his titanic contemporaries, Haydn, Mozart and Beethoven.

Nevertheless, it was lovely to hear this work sung and played with such finesse and devotion.

The fugal section which closes the "Gloria", with its no fewer than 218 repetitions across the ensemble of the single word "Amen", gave me particular pleasure as it reminded me how mischievously Berlioz had lampooned it in his famous chorus from Faust.

Especially effective too were the "Et Incarnatus Est" passage sung by the alto section and the elegant "Benedictus" (a welcome change of key here), which in a strange way seems to pre-echo the German Requiem and Liebeslieder Waltzes of Brahms.

Even stanger - in the opening of the "Agnus Dei" the ensemble conjured an almost Wagnerian glow, as if this music were a chorus from the missing nuptial scenes of Tristan and Isolde, complete with a variation on the famous "Tristan chord" sung early in the movement!

Choir and orchestra performed these sections with a rare tenderness and poise.

The orchestral version of John Rutter's "Winchester Te Deum" which followed is beautifully crafted as a piece, with more than a nod in the direction of Britten and Walton. It was vividly conducted by Mr Gough, and the softer, more reflective sections, frequently preceded by flute, oboe or clarinet solos, were heartfelt and lovely. Congratulations too to the choir and orchestra for the thrilling finale of the piece!

After the interval, there were several "stand out" moments".

Thank you, Father Christmas, for your witty observations on the perils of current local travel arrangments!

Musically, I treasure three "highs".

Firstly, the Children's Choir sang a gem of a piece in Walters' "Little Camel Boy". The children were beautifully prepared and presented and gave a tender, focussed and professional performance. Brilliant to have the audience join in with Silent Night as a hummed chorale theme in the final verse. Lovely orchestration too, especially in the woodwind, which again put the writer in mind of Berlioz - this time the pastoral sections of "L'Enfance du Christ". Lovely stuff!

Secondly, there was a sense of real fun for the orchestral strings in the movement from Hely-Hutchinson's "Carol Symphony" - a sort of Young Person's Guide to O Come All Ye Faithful!